Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

MHS Library | Wominjeka Project (Year 9)

What can Melbourne do to protect its biodiversity?

CHOOSE A MINIMUM OF 2 RESOURCES

Indigenous plant use - booklet

 

Research fellow Zena Cumpston, a Barkandji woman, created the new Indigenous plant use booklet to help individuals, schools and community groups in Victoria grow and appreciate indigenous plants. It contains information on more than 50 indigenous plant species, and labels that can be printed, laminated and displayed in the garden.

Cumpston has spent the last two years researching Indigenous perspectives of biodiversity in urban areas. Her work has focused on the south-east region of Australia.

She discovered that Indigenous plant knowledge is not well understood by a wider audience. Yet Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have used plants for nutrition, medicine and technology (such as traps, nets and weapons) for thousands of generations. This knowledge has helped them to thrive as the oldest living culture in the world.

 

Cumpston, Z. (n.d.). Indigenous plant use A booklet on the medicinal, nutritional and technological use of indigenous plants Acknowledgement of Country. Retrieved December 7, 2022, from https://libguides.mhs.vic.edu.au/ld.php?content_id=50711074

Magpies, curlews, peregrine falcons: how birds adapt to our cities, bringing wonder, joy and conflict.

Magpies, curlews, peregrine falcons: how birds adapt to our cities, bringing wonder, joy and conflict.

Most Australians live in urban areas. In cities, we live within an orderly landscape, moulded and manufactured by us to suit our needs. But other species also live in this modified environment.

 

Woinarski, J. (2022, September 28). Magpies, curlews, peregrine falcons: how birds adapt to our cities, bringing wonder, joy and conflict. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/magpies-curlews-peregrine-falcons-how-birds-adapt-to-our-cities-bringing-wonder-joy-and-conflict-190647

Yes, the state of the environment is grim, but you can make a difference, right in your own neighbourhood.

Yes, the state of the environment is grim, but you can make a difference, right in your own neighbourhood.

The Australia State of the Environment Report, 2021 (a Commonwealth Government funded report) shows every Australian can be on the conservation frontline. We can save species in the places we live and work.

 

Soanes, K. (2022, July 20). Yes, the state of the environment is grim, but you can make a difference, right in your own neighbourhoood. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/yes-the-state-of-the-environment-is-grim-but-you-can-make-a-difference-right-in-your-own-neighbourhoood-187259

Protecting Victoria's Environment, Biodiversity 2037

Environment. (2022, August 9). Biodiversity 2037. Environment. https://www.environment.vic.gov.au/biodiversity/biodiversity-plan

Did you know that two thirds of the type of foods we eat would not be available without bees?

Did you know that two thirds of the type of foods we eat would not be available without bees? Bees@UniMelb is a volunteer-run initiative of six beehives that increase the biodiversity of our urban campuses. Bees@UniMelb is a volunteer-run initiative of six beehives that increase the biodiversity of our urban campuses. Learn more here.

 

The. (2020). Parkville Sustainability Tour: Bees@UniMelb [YouTube Video]. In YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wL7Sr0Wzoc&ab_channel=TheUniversityofMelbourne

Climate change threatens up to 100% of trees in Australian cities, and most urban species worldwide.

Climate change threatens up to 100% of trees in Australian cities, and most urban species worldwide.

 

Jaana Dielenberg, Lenoir, J., Esperon-Rodriguez, M., Tjoelker, M. G., & Gallagher, R. (2022, September 19). Climate change threatens up to 100% of trees in Australian cities, and most urban species worldwide. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/climate-change-threatens-up-to-100-of-trees-in-australian-cities-and-most-urban-species-worldwide-188807

Biodiversity Conservation strategy for Melbourne’s growth corridors.

Biodiversity Conservation strategy for Melbourne’s growth corridors.

 

Biodiversity Conservation strategy for MelBourne’s growth Corridors. (2013). https://www.msa.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0032/64787/Biodiversity-Conservation-Strategy-Jun-2013.pdf

Bill gives protection to endangered species, 1987

 

Bill gives protection to endangered species - The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) - 24 Jul 1987. (2014). Trove; Trove. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/118145602

Neglected native pasture plants, an article from 1869

NEGLECTED NATIVE PASTURE PLANTS. - (From the Melbourne Leader.) - The Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1860 - 1938) - 27 Mar 1869. (2014). Trove; Trove. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/264157050?searchTerm=native%20melbourne

CHOOSE A DATA SET

Pre-colonial plant list

This dataset contains plant species and their occurence within the City of Melbourne area before 1835. It is based on the "Pre-colonial plant list for the City of Melbourne" produced by S.J. Sinclair, G. Sutter and M. Duncan of the Arthur Rylah Institute. 

Codes are used in this Plant List that refer to the likelihood of the species having occurred in pre-colonial City of Melbourne:

  • 0 Did not occur
  • 1 Unlikely to have occurred
  • 2.1 Quite likely (at low cover)
  • 2.2 Quite likely (may have been prominent in places (>5% cover))
  • 3.1 Highly likely or known to have occurred (low cover)
  • 3.2 Highly likely or known to have occurred (>5% cover)
  • - Certain

Victoria. (2022, June 22). Pre-colonial plant list. Vic.gov.au. https://data.melbourne.vic.gov.au/Environment/Pre-colonial-plant-list/tiye-63d3

Bird Survey Results for Areas in the City of Melbourne, February and March 2018

This dataset contains survey data for bird species across various river and wetland locations in the City of Melbourne. 

City of Melbourne. (2019, January 8). Bird Survey Results for Areas in the City of Melbourne, February and March 2018. Vic.gov.au. https://data.melbourne.vic.gov.au/Environment/Bird-Survey-Results-for-Areas-in-the-City-of-Melbo/6cxw-5y4y

Butterfly biodiversity survey 2017

The Our City's Little Gems study observed butterfly biodiversity and flower-butterfly interactions in the City of Melbourne between January - March 2017.

City of Melbourne. (2018, May 3). Butterfly biodiversity survey 2017. Vic.gov.au. https://data.melbourne.vic.gov.au/Environment/Butterfly-biodiversity-survey-2017/kmtd-nvqr