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Extended Investigation (VCE): EI marking rubric and activities

Rubric and academic writing

5. Clarity and effectiveness of writing

Little organisation of ideas and limited adaptation of the report for an educated non-specialist audience.

Some development and some organisation of ideas and adaptation of the report for an educated non- specialist audience.

Orderly development of ideas and largely accessible adaptation of the report for an educated non-specialist audience.

Very clear and well-structured development of ideas and report adapted well for an educated non-specialist audience.

Well-structured and convincing development of ideas and report highly accessible and tailored to an educated non-specialist audience.

6. Observance of report writing conventions including citations and bibliographic reference of sources

Little use of the structural conventions of writing a research report, including academic citations, attributions and bibliographic details.

Some use of the structural conventions for writing a research report including academic citations, attributions and bibliographic details.

Satisfactory use of structural conventions for writing a research report including academic citations, attributions and bibliographic details.

Thorough use of structural conventions for writing a research reporting including academic citations, attributions and bibliographic details.

Comprehensive and proficient use of structural conventions for writing a research report including academic citations, attributions and bibliographic details.

After each activity add your comments/learning on your journal.

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Activity 1: Well-structured / structural conventions

Have you read the Melbourne Uni guide that was given to last week? Test yourself on understanding the structure of your report.

You can find the activity to test your understanding here.

Activity 2: Highly accessible

GRAMMAR GRAMMAR GRAMMAR. These are four (4) of the most common mistakes made in report writing.

I am going to assume that everyone knows TO WRITE THE REPORT IN THE THIRD PERSON.

Step 1. Tense Consistency

Try this activity. Printed handout available.

Step 2. Transitions

This page has a comprehensive list of transitions and how they can be used to give further meaning in your writing.

There is an optional quiz at the end of this page. Printed handout available.

Step 3. Sentence Structure

Try this activity. Printed handout available.

Step 4. Eliminating Wordiness

Try this activity. Printed handout available.

 

Activity 3: Tailored to an educated non-specialist audience

Look at the language you have used in your research report.

Step 1. Abbreviations

Can you create abbreviations for the names of organisations, government groups etc that you refer to more than three (3) or more times in your report? Abbreviations reduce the word count.

For example; Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA)

The first time you use the name of an organisation in your report, you use the full name, after that you use just the abbreviation.

Abbreviations do not appear in an abstract.

What abbreviations will you be using in your report?

 

Step 2. Numerical consistency

What dates, percentage figures or numbers will use in your report?

Most whole numbers should be written in full followed by the numerical value in brackets. Larger numbers, over 999, do not have to be written in full.

For example; one hundred and fifty-four (154)

Numbers in tables and figures can be written as a numerical value

For example 154

All dates should be written consistently

For example 3 July 2014

In the body of the report all percentage figures should be written in full with the word percentage after it, followed by the numerical value and a percentage sign in brackets.

For example; fifty-four percent (54%)

Percentage figures in tables and figures can be written as a numerical value and/ a percentage sign

For example 54%

WHY? is to ensure no mistake is made when sharing research.

 

Step 3. Definitions

You only need to define uncommon words that you will use repeatedly, for example, "tryptophan". If you are not sure whether it is a common word, ask a friend/teacher.

Definitions must be defined succinctly and in layman terms, try using the Macquarie Dictionary (found online via the SLV). Ms Morscheck has the SLV Macquarie Dictionary access right NOW, ask her it email you definitions you may need.

 

 

Activity 4: Academic in-text citations

The MHS LibGuide Referencing: Bibliography and Citation List - Introduction is a comprehensive guide to creating citations and placing them in a bibliography.

You need to reference all materials in your report that are not

  • presumed knowledge
  • not your original ideas

Go to the Referencing: Bibliography and Citation List - Introduction and create an account with either "citethisforme" or "MyBib". If you  already have an account, login.

MAKE SURE YOUR ACCOUNT IS SETUP TO MAKE CITATIONS USING referencing style APA. 

 

Complete this activity to correctly identify the in-text citation.

You will have to open the links provided, use either your "citethisforme" or "MyBib" account to create a citation for the link and then you will be able to identify the correct in-text citation.

 

If you would like to know how to use the MyBib Chrome extension, see Ms Morscheck.