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Digital Citizenship: Copyright

Difference between Copyright and Plagiarism

  • Plagiarism is using the ideas from another person as your own.
  • Copyright is the violation of rights that belong to the owner of the work.

Plagiarism occurs when a student uses someone else’s materials in their work and pretends that it is their own. If the student has used alot of this material, without that person’s permission, copyright may occur.

You need to reference when you use someone else's material to paraphrase, summarise or quote. A bibliography of the references you use is essential.

EVEN IF YOU CREATE A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE REFERENCES, IF YOU USE TOO MUCH OF SOMEONE'S MATERIAL, WITHOUT THAT PERSON'S PERMISSION, COPYRIGHT MAY OCCUR.

What Can I Copy?

The Copyright Law includes 'Fair Dealing'  for students and education. This allows you as a student to use or copy some material without the owners permission BUT only for the following purposes:

  • Research or study
  • Criticism or review
  • Parody or satire
  • Reporting news

This is a rough guide to how much you can copy:

  • One chapter of a book or 10% of the pages (10% of the words if the work is in an electronic form or online)
  • One article from a journal/magazine or newspaper (more if the articles are on the same subject matter in the same issue)

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LibGuides: Primary Sources: Arts (Art, Music, Video, Literature). (2020). Fau.Edu. https://libguides.fau.edu/c.php?g=325382&p=2181557

In all other cases, the Copyright Law is silent on how much you can copy to be considered ‘Fair Dealing’. This means that no guidance is provided on how much of a sound recording, film, image or broadcast you can use for your studies. As a general rule, you should only copy what is necessary, and in most cases this will only be a small portion.

YOU MUST CREATE A BIBLIOGRAPHY TO REFERENCE ALL WORKS USED.

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The educators' guide to copyright, fair use and creative commons