Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

MHS Library | How to cite and reference your sources (Monash University)

Art works - paintings

  • Cite works of art in notes only (not in your bibliography).
  • Italicize the titles of paintings and sculptures.

Include the following information:

  • name of the artist
  • title of the work
  • date it was created
  • type of materials (optional)
  • dimensions of the work (optional)
  • name of the institution that houses the work, including location (for artworks and museum exhibits)

Example:

cleopatra-ngv-scaled
Figure 1. Giambattista Tiepolo, The Banquet of Cleopatra, 1743-44

---------------------------------------------------------
   1. Giambattista Tiepolo, The Banquet of Cleopatra, 1743-44, oil on canvas, 250.3 x 357.0 cm, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

Art works - photographs

  • Cite works of art in notes only (not in your bibliography).
  • Enclose titles of photographs in quotation marks and do not italicize.

Include the following information:

  • name of the photographer
  • title of the work
  • date it was created
  • type of materials (optional)
  • dimensions of the work (optional)
  • name of the institution that houses the work, including location (for artworks and museum exhibits)

Example:

sunbaker-ngv-scaled
Figure 2. Max Dupain, "The Sunbaker", 1937 (printed c. 1975)


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2. Max Dupain, "The Sunbaker", 1937 (printed c. 1975), gelatin silver photograph, 38.0 x 43.1 cm, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

Images from books

If you found the image in a book, you will need to identify the source:

  • author
  • title
  • publisher
  • place of publication
  • date
  • page
  • figure or plate number of the reproduction

Examples:

1. The Banquet of Cleopatra, 1743-44, in Ted Gott and Laurie Benson, Painting and Sculpture before 1800 in the International Collections of the National Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne: National Gallery of Victoria, 2003), 102

2. Max Dupain, "The Sunbaker", 1937 (printed c. 1975), in Isobel Crombie, Body Culture: Max Dupain, Photography and Australian Culture, 1919-1939 (Images Publishing Group in association with National Gallery of Victoria, 2004), 150, 17.1.

Images on the web

If you found the image online you will need as well:

  • URL
  • access date
  • image ID number (if available)
  • possibly copyright permission (required if you were publishing the image on the web)

Examples:

1. Giambattista Tiepolo, The Banquet of Cleopatra, 1743-44, oil on canvas, 250.3 x 357.0 cm, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/col/work/4409, (accessed 24 May, 2012)

2. Max Dupain, "The Sunbaker", 1937 (printed c. 1975), gelatin silver photograph, 38.0 x 43.1 cm, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/col/work/7621 (accessed 24 May, 2012).

 

Positioning images in your text

  • Images inserted in your academic paper are called figures.
  • Every figure should have a number and caption.
  • Figure captions are normally presented in a smaller typeface than the rest of the text.
  • A figure should follow as closely as possible the paragraph in which it is mentioned.
  • When you refer to a figure in the text, specify the figure number ("in figure 10") rather than its location ("below").
  • Do not capitalize the word figure in text references to figures and do not abbreviate it as fig. except in parathentical references (see fig. 10).
  • In addition to the caption, you would normally cite the image in a footnote (indicated in the text by a superscript number placed at the end of the sentence and after the full stop), in which you refer to the image.

Example: In his painting The Banquet of Cleopatra (see fig. 10), Tiepolo portrays a famous contest where Cleopatra wins a wager with Mark Antony by dissolving a pearl earring in a glass of vinegar and drinking it.1

 cleopatra-ngv-scaled


 

 

 



 

 

 

Giambattista Tiepolo, The Banquet of Cleopatra, 1743-44, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1. Giambattista Tiepolo, The Banquet of Cleopatra, 1743-44, oil on canvas, 250.3 x 357.0 cm, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

Images from ARTstor

irises-van-gogh

Figure 1. Vincent van Gogh, Irises, 1890, Metropolitan Museum of Art.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1. Vincent van Gogh, Irises, 1890, oil on canvas, 73.7 x 92.1 cm, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Adele R. Levy, 1958 (58.187) Photographed by Malcolm Varon. ARTstor Image ID MMA_IAP_1039651317.