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Bibliography: Manage your bibliography using 'citethisforme'

Referencing styles; creating a bibliography

Use citethisforme

'citethisforme' is an easy way to cite your sources correctly.

This is what the front page options look like:

 

Selecting Harvard, for example, you will see these options:

When you select 'website', you can either generate the citation by adding the url, or else get help creating the citation manually.

This page also links to the 'pdf form' and the 'image form'.

Follow the options for journals and books. The 'cog' icon takes you to a large range of other reference types:

Glossary of terms (from 'citethisforme'

Chrome extension

You can add a Chrome extension to make it easier to create citations on the spot.

You can get a Microsoft Word Add-On:

Information from 'citethisforme'

Why Citing Matters

Citing isn’t something you usually think about, but it’s important nonetheless. Without even realizing it, you do it already in your everyday life in little ways. Have you ever said, “I heard on XYZ News that . . . ,“ or “I read in XYZ that those two celebrities are dating,” or even “Mom said that you can’t do that.” By saying where you got your information, you are casually citing a source.

We do this because it gives credibility to what we say, but also because it credits the originator of the information and allows others to follow up if they need more information. Formal citing done for papers and projects takes this a step further. In addition to the reasons mentioned above, citing sources in academia provides evidence of your research process and helps you avoid plagiarism.

Plagiarism is a word you never want to hear describing your work. You’ve probably seen headlines in the news and heard stories in school about the negative consequences of plagiarism. It’s not good but it is preventable. By visiting Cite This For Me to create citations, you’re taking steps to to help avoid this.

What Are You Citing?: Source Type Options

Do you know what you’re citing? Answering this question is usually the first step in creating a citation. On Cite This For Me, you can choose from a list of 30+ source types. It doesn’t matter if you’re citing a website, book, video, online image, or something totally different. Cite This For Me has you covered.

How Does This Work?

Immediately start citing by clicking on the website or journal article icon. If you’re using another source type, like book, click “More” to see all available options. From there, a form will pop up and show you all of the information you should look for in your source. Remember: the information for sources can vary (e.g. one photo may have a title, another photo may have none), so the forms do not require a completely filled out form to add a reference. You can create a citation at any time and also go back and edit it as many times as you want.

To help you save even more time and effort when citing websites, books, and journal articles, Cite This For Me will automatically find reference information and fill out some of the form for you. It sounds like a school myth but it’s true! When citing these sources, you start off with a search bar that assists you in finding the source you are referencing. Once you select the proper source from the listed results, you’ll be shown what information was and was not found, then taken directly to the form. Here you can confirm, edit, and add any information before adding the reference to your list—you’re always in control and have the final say on your references.

Choosing a Citation Style

Odds are, you’ve been given a specific citation style to use by your teacher, publication, editor, or colleague. (If not, try MLA format, APA citation, or Harvard referencing as they are the most popular.) Did you know there are literally thousands of citations styles in the world? Fortunately, Cite This For Me has a lot of them! In the navigation bar, click “2. Choose style” to open our citation style search widget and select the right style for you!

Citation Guides: Understanding it All

Beyond simply creating references or citations, most citation styles have additional guidelines about paper formatting, in-text citations, and other details. Cite This For Me citation guides covers a lot of this additional information, so your paper is more properly prepped and less likely to get points taken off for these details. The citation guides cover several citation styles, but the most popular are APA, Chicago Manual of style, MLA, Harvard referencing, Normas APA and Normas ABNT.

Information from 'citethisforme'

Is your source credible?

Don’t forget to consider these factors.

Purpose : Reason the source exists
  • Is the point of the information to inform, persuade, teach, or sell?
  • Do the authors/publishers make their intentions clear?
  • Does the information appear to be fact or opinion?
  • Does the point of view seem impartial? Do they identify counter-arguments?
Authority - Author:Source of the information
  • Who is the author? What are their credentials or qualifications?
  • What makes the author qualified to write on this topic?
  • Is there clearly defined contact information for the author?
Authority - Publisher:Source of the information
  • Who is the publisher? Is it a non-profit, government agency, or organization? How might this affect their point of view?
  • What makes the publisher qualified to generate works on this subject?
  • What can the URL tell you about the publisher? For instance, .gov may signify that it is a government agency.
Accuracy : Reliability and truthfulness of the content
  • Where does the information come from?
  • Can the information presented be verified? Is it supported by evidence that is clearly cited?
  • Does the language used seem free of emotion, and does the work seem impartial and objective?
  • Are there any spelling or grammatical errors? If an online source, are all links working?
  • If it was reproduced, who edited/reproduced it? Where was the information originally published?
  • How original are the ideas presented in the work? Do they seem to be common knowledge?
Relevance : Importance of the information to your topic
  • Does the information relate to your topic, or answer the question you have presented?
  • Who is the intended audience of the work? Does that audience match with yours?
  • Have you looked at other sources related to this one? Does it seem there are many others on the topic?
  • Are you utilizing the entire source, or just a part of it?
Currency : Timeliness of the information
  • When was the information published? When was it last updated? Does it reflect the most current information available?
  • How does your topic fit in with this source’s publication date? Do you need current information to make your point or do older sources work better?
Comprehensiveness
  • Does the source present one or multiple viewpoints on your topic?
  • Does the source present a large amount of information on the topic? Or is it short and focused?
  • Are there any points you feel may have been left out, on purpose or accidentally, that affect its comprehensiveness?

Misunderstandings that lead to accidental plagiarism (from 'citethisforme')

Reading this article about how you might end up with accidental plagiarism could save you stress!!